Taro: Garden Miracles From Taiwan

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Taro: Another Taiwan Blessing

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Bountiful fruit and vegetable gardens, loving springtime in Taiwan!

Taro: Garden Miracles From Taiwan

Taro is an perennial plant that grows as tall as the average person. It has leaves that are heart shaped and large. They are commonly called Elephant Ears. Both the root, which are often 2-4 pounds, and the young leaves are good for food. Taro grows best in warm humid climates. It loves wet marshy conditions. The general nutrition of a cup of taro is as follows:

  1. Nutrition Facts
    Taro leaves, raw
    Taro leaves, steamed
    Taro, cooked
    Taro, raw
    Taro, raw

    Amount Per
    100 grams
    1 cup, sliced (104 g)

    Calories 117
  2. % Daily Value*
    Total Fat 0.2 g 0%
    Saturated fat 0 g 0%
    Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g
    Monounsaturated fat 0 g
    Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
    Sodium 11 mg 0%
    Potassium 615 mg 17%
    Total Carbohydrate 28 g 9%
    Dietary fiber 4.3 g 17%
    Sugar 0.4 g
    Protein 1.6 g 3%
    Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 7%
    Calcium 4% Iron 3%
    Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 15%
    Vitamin B-12 0% Magnesium 8%
    *Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

    Notice the high amount of Potassium and fiber in each cup. What a powerhouse of Potassium! The fiber content is high! That is helpful for weight control. There is also a good amount of B Vitamins and Magnesium. In many tropical countries it is the center of the diet. Taro is considered to be one of the first cultivated plants by humans. It’s tubers are an important part of cuisines the world over. In Hawai’i poi is made from the cooked tubers, much like mashed potatoes. The leaves and stems are used for greens. This is a diet stable on the islands. It is the center of every meal. The cooked greens are delicious. What is there not to like about this awesome plant?

    So what is so great about this beautiful plant? It comes complete with many health benefits. It is really easy on digestion, has been known to lower blood sugar, and there is evidence to suggest it helps to prevent certain types of cancers. It is known to protect the skin and is a significant boost to vision. It increases circulation and helps to lower blood pressure. It is a valuable aid to the immune system and helps in the prevention of heart disease. It is known to support muscles and aid in nerve health. Taro is a valuable gift from the tropics. Be sure …read more

    Source:: Taro: Garden Miracles From Taiwan

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Katmai National Park And Preserve Alaska

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Flying over Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska

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Flying over Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska

Katmai National Park And Preserve Alaska

Katmai National Park And Preserve is one of the most delightful parks you can ever visit. Where else can you safely be 50 feet from a bear ? Where can you view not one active volcano, but six in one park? Most visitors to the park begin their visit at Brooks Camp. This is one of the few areas of the park that is developed. While few visitors choose to venture past the bear viewing platform, there is much to do in the Katmai National Park And Preserve. If camping , you will be given instructions for taking care of your food. This is a primitive site and you must bring all your food and water. There is none onsite. Rangers at the park work hard to prevent the bears getting any human food. It is for this reason, that they are uniquely unafraid of visitors to the park. They will allow people to get much closer than they do elsewhere. Those who wish to come closer and photograph the bears are able to do so. There are also webcams installed throughout the park and these pictures can be seen on your computer or phone. July and September are the best months for viewing the Brown Bears in the park. Watch them care for their cubs. Marvel as they look for food. Watch them go fishing! Salmon is a major food source. Can you out fish a bear?

In addition to the famous bears, Katmai National Park And Preserve generally has many moose, gray wolves, beavers, porcupines, and other mammals. In some winters, Caribou occasionally spend the winter. Marine mammals commonly found in Katmai National Park And Preserve are hair seals, sea lions,and sea otters. You can often see Beluga Whales, Orcas, and Gray Whales also.

Activities at Katmai include hiking, backpacking, camping, backcountry skiing in winter, fishing, kayaking, boat tours, and many interpretive programs. Visit the many volcanoes in the park. Check out the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. Kayak down one of the amazing rivers. Take a boat tour. There are many tours with in the Katmai National Park And Preserve. One of the favorite ones is the Bear Tours. Following there is a link for Alaska Bear Adventures—-Day and Multi Day Tours.

http://alaskabearviewing.com/?mm_campaign=020bd8501191dc5f9eb0db76376bd6ba&mm_replace=true&gclid=CjwKEAjw3sKpBRDJ7rDqzsyuhDASJACZAiki9zKTx8LDXvFzLs962CmNrFkzCg3j66iKqTzayz07ghoCzJzw_wcB

There …read more

Source:: Katmai National Park And Preserve Alaska

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Eyam, Derbyshire: The village that sacrificed itself

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By David Whitley

One of Eyam's plague cottages.

One of Eyam’s plague cottages.

Britain’s most infamous ‘plague village’ has a harrowing tale of exceptional self-sacrifice to tell.

In the graveyard outside the Eyam Parish Church is the chunky, box-like tomb of Catherine Mompesson. For her husband, Catherine’s death in August 1666 was the personal cost of a grim but noble sacrifice.

These days, the small Derbyshire village of Eyam plays host to walkers eager to stretch their legs around the Peak District National Park. But in September 1665, something altogether more sinister took residence.

That year, the plague spread from London across England. What’s remarkable about Eyam is the measures the villagers took to stop it going any further.

The Eyam Museum is full of tales about the horrors that befell the village over the course of 14 months. The bubonic plague is thought to have arrived from London in a tailor’s package. The first victim, George Viccars, was the servant who opened it.

Viccars was to be the first of 260 to die in Eyam – which had a probable population of around 650 to 750. The disease spread across the village alarmingly fast, carried by fleas living on black rats. Some people lost more than a dozen relatives.

In the spring of 1666, when the fatality numbers were still relatively low, three brave decisions were taken. William Mompesson, the village’s rector, gathered the villagers in Cucklet Delph – a natural amphitheatre with a rock arch that’s a short walk from the Eyam Hall car park. At the meeting, it was agreed that all church services would now take place in the Delph, to prevent transmission through close proximity.

It was also agreed that organised funerals and burials would be abandoned – bodies would be disposed of, by family members, as quickly as possible. Mompesson would later have to do this for his wife’s corpse.

Thirdly, and most terrifyingly, they agreed to quarantine the village. No-one was allowed in, and no-one was allowed out. All food and supplies would be left by a boundary stone to the south or a well to the north, with money paying for them to be disinfected in vinegar. The boundary stone and well are still in the same places today, at the end of walking trails.

The villagers were essentially sealing themselves in to a death trap, with the fatality rate booming over the summer of ‘66.

Some …read more

Source:: Eyam, Derbyshire: The village that sacrificed itself

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Independence Mine: Hatcher Pass Alaska

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Independence-Mine-Hatcher-Pass-in-Alaska

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Independence Mine: Hatcher Pass, Alaska

Independence Mine: Hatcher Pass Alaska

Independence Mine was a beautiful mountain meadow with gold as it’s theme. Even before gold was discovered farther North, Hatcher Pass did not disappoint. Robert Lee Hatcher discovered gold in the Willow Creek Valley in 1906. Robert Lee Hatcher staked the first lode gold claim in the Willow Creek Valley. Gold was in the air! Soon after, many joined him in the search for this valuable ore. Gold fever was contagious! Gold was the magic word that drew thousands to the area to seek their fortune. They lived for Gold. They endured the long winters in poor quarters. They gave it their all! Gold became their life!

Lode mining was extremely expensive for an individual operator. It required special equipment to dig the tunnels. There was a need for a lot of heavy equipment that they did not have. Soon, companies were established to pool resources and share expenses. Equipment was bought and shared. Mining co-ops flourished and grew. This was the beginning of what is today, Independence Mine.

Independence Mine was originally two mines. The Alaska Free Gold Mine was on Skyscraper Mountain. What a beautiful area for a mine. The view from the mountain is fantastic. The valley is filled with wildflowers in the spring. Independence Mine was on Granite Mountain. It was another beautiful site. In 1938 these two mines became one. The new company was called the Alaska Pacific Consolidated Mining Company. The new company now had 83 mining claims and became the largest producer in the Willow Creek Valley. They pooled their resources and the mountain produced the product. Gold fever was alive in Hatcher Pass.

Today, the two sites are just known as Independence Mine. The Mountain Park location is home to a small gold mining museum. There is also a self guided tour that you can take. This interpretive tour allows you to discover a mining camp for yourself. Breath the air! Can you smell the gold? History comes alive at Independence Mine. Hatcher Pass is rich in living history! Gold, is the magic word.

Find out what it is like to live and work in one of Alaska’s largest mining camps. Try your hand at panning for gold. Can you see it? Many find it today. Gold is in the air! Enjoy the brisk fresh air! Skip through the meadows …read more

Source:: Independence Mine: Hatcher Pass Alaska

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Tanana Valley State Forest Alaska

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Grizzly bear munching on roots and grasses in Tanana Valley State Forest Alaska

By Exploretraveler.com:

Grizzly bear munching on roots and grasses in Tanana Valley State Forest Alaska

Tanana Valley State Forest Alaska

The Tanana Valley State Forest is beautifully forested. Here you will find forests of balsam popular, black spruce, paper birch, quaking aspen, tamarack and white spruce. The Tanana Valley is one of the most picturesque places in Alaska. The variety of trees and bushes in the valley make it an awesome place to explore. Here you will find many different types of wild life. The brown bear and the magnificent Grizzly Bear wander through the forest nibbling on the roots and grasses of the valley floor. Here they raise their young and look for wild berries a long the way. How awesome it is to see them in their own environment.

One of the awesome treats of the Tanana Valley is the ability to camp among the balsam popular, black spruce, paper birch, quaking aspen, tamarack and white spruce. Can you imagine lying in your tent and hearing the winds blow through the forest? Or sitting in your RV with the doors and windows open and enjoying the beautiful breezes of the day. Think about sitting under your awning and watching the sun go down. Then consider coming back in three hours and watching it come up again. Imagine sitting in the sun at midnight having tea. What possibilities come to mind. All this and more is possible, while camping at the Tanana Valley Campground & RV Park. Now this is adventure! What fun awaits at the Tanana Valley Campground & RV Park.

The Tanana Valley Campground & RV Park is located just a short 10 minutes from downtown Fairbanks. That is just a short brisk walk, or catch the shuttle. The campground is located near the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center. Here you will discover the culture and history of the interior of Alaska. Guests can actually take Denali shuttle buses to many different local attractions within Fairbanks. There are also many trips and tours available to many different destinations throughout Alaska and the Arctic. Information and reservations for the campground can be had by calling the campground.

Tanana Valley Campground & RV Park
1-907-456-7956
1800 College Road
Fairbanks, AK 99709

Another bonus is that the Tanana Valley Campground and RV Park can put you in touch with a tour company that can take you to see all …read more

Source:: Tanana Valley State Forest Alaska

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