Mong Kok Wet Market Hong Kong

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By Exploretraveler.com

Mong Kok Wet Markets

By Exploretraveler.com:

Mong Kok Wet Markets Hong Kong

Mong Kok Wet Market For Roasted Goose

Mong Kok Wet Market is not for the squeamish at heart. Most things sold at the Mong Kok Wet Market are actually sold alive. Turtles, fish, goose, etc are actually living when bought and killed on the spot. Then they are cleaned and cooked especially for you, the customer. While the fruit and vegetable markets are actually comparable to a farmers market, much of what you see will be different. Hong Kong has many tropical plants and trees that we do not see in most of the U.S. This is not so with the meat and fish markets. You might see a whole goose with it’s feet, frogs jumping around, or fish, swimming around in an aquarium. The customer picks his fish or frog and it is killed, cleaned, and prepared right then. How fresh can you get?

In the Mong Kok Wet Market for Roasted Goose, there is one difference. The goose is sold whole but it has been cleaned and roasted. It is sold without the head or the feet. The customer buys the whole goose. In the Roasted goose market there is a limited amount of sliced goose available. Most of the meat markets are not so. When you buy the hog, it is hanging meat. This meat comes complete with the head and the hoofs. Only large animals are cut up a little more for convenience.

The concept of the fresh market is so different for the average Western Tourist. In the Western World, the customer is quite removed from the source of his or her food. He or she goes to a market and gets some meat that is all ready for the pan. In the Western World, we seldom see the whole process. In most of Asia, the customer oversees the whole process from the animal being killed and cleaned, to the actual food preparation. It is a completely different idea as to what the word ‘fresh’ means.

Next time you go to the market, think about where that lamb leg has been. How old is it? Has it been previously frozen? It may change your idea as to what ‘fresh’ really is. So enjoy the Mong Kok Wet Market on your next Hong Kong vacation. The Mong Kok Wet Market is an adventure you will not want to miss.

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Source:: Mong Kok Wet Market Hong Kong

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Rick Steves’ European Christmas: Presepi Manger Scenes—Rome’s Bethlehem Home Show

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By Rick Steves

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A wonderful tradition in Italy is churches and communities making creative manger scenes and putting them on display through the Christmas season.

These presepi, as manger scenes are called in Italy, originated 800 years ago just north of Rome, in Assisi. St. Francis was a master at teaching Bible lessons with clever props, and he figured out that a manger scene helped people relate to the Christmas message more vividly. Ever since then, the Baby Jesus has been shown on his day of birth in a humble setting, in local scenes that have not a hint of Bethlehem: an Italian setting for Italian viewers (or an Arctic scene for Eskimos) to connect more intimately with the story of the Nativity.

In Rome, it was a Bethlehem home show, as all over town creative crèches were on display. Here’s a collection of some of our favorites — ranging from holy to homemade to mod to igloos.

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You can watch my full hour-long Christmas special at https://www.ricksteves.com/christmas

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Source:: Rick Steves’ European Christmas: Presepi Manger Scenes—Rome’s Bethlehem Home Show

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Taiwan’s Papaya Tree And It’s Uses

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Taiwan's Papaya Tree

By Exploretraveler.com:

Taiwan’s Papaya Tree

Taiwan’s Papaya Tree And How To Use It

Taiwan’s Papaya Tree is found all over the island of Taiwan. The humble Papaya Tree is grown in almost every small orchard and around every house. You can not even take a walk to the beach without seeing a Papaya Tree at the beach. So why the love affair with the Papaya Tree?

Taiwan’s Papaya Tree, as humble as it may appear, is one of the most well used fruits in the world. Papaya can be used for food, an aid in cooking meat, and also in traditional medicine. If you rub papaya on the meat or soak meat in its juices it is a natural tenderizer. It is a delightful fruit to eat. It is one of the three most important fruits in the world. Even the stem and bark of Taiwan’s Papaya Tree is used in the production of rope. In some cuisine, the small flower buds are cooked as a delicacy. It is loaded with Vitamins, Calcium, Iron, and Minerals and has 21 mg of Magnesium and 182 mg of Potassium. Even the black seeds are edible and are often used for the prevention and cure of internal parasites. The leaves when cleaned and dried make a good tea and can be used fresh on nervous wounds. So what is not, to like about Taiwan’s Papaya Tree?

When the fruit of Taiwan’s Papaya Tree is a yellow/orange it is considered ripe and can be eaten raw without skin or seeds. It is often eaten in salads, fresh in a fruit bowl, and is delicious with homemade vanilla ice cream. The green papaya is considered not ripe and is used in the cooking of stews, curries, and salads. Papaya is awesome cut up with vegetables and greens for a salad. I use the papaya, banana, and potato daily as they are an aid in the control of blood pressure. Papaya makes an excellent jelly due to the huge amount of natural pectin. Even the seeds are editable and are used in cooking. They can be put in smoothies and then drank to help with parasites. They are often dried and ground in a pepper mill. In cooking these dried seeds can be used in the place of black pepper. The leaves of Taiwan’s Papaya Tree are really good steamed like you would steam spinach. I sometimes prepare …read more

Source:: Taiwan’s Papaya Tree And It’s Uses

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Youngest team members getting ready to dive. http://ift.tt/1n3zlgU

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Onboard our scuba boat heading out to a protected reef. http://ift.tt/1n3zlgU

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